Skip to main content Skip to navigation
Office of Assessment of Teaching and Learning Workshops

Workshops

The Office of Assessment of Teaching and Learning (ATL) offers a variety of workshops to support undergraduate degree-granting programs in developing assessment systems that improve teaching, learning and curriculum. In addition to the workshops below, ATL can create or tailor a workshop to specifically fit program needs. Contact an assessment specialist to schedule a workshop, or request more information.


Assessment 101: Orientation for Chairs and/or Assessment Coordinators

This workshop will introduce the basics of program assessment as well as the assessment resources and requirements at WSU. It is designed to be useful for any faculty member who is new to assessment and will be especially useful for new chairs or new assessment coordinators.

Participants will learn:

  • The six essential elements of assessment
  • What an assessment cycle looks like
  • Assessment roles and responsibilities
  • Support offered by WSU’s Office of Assessment of Teaching and Learning (ATL)
  • Annual reporting requirements and strategies

Student Learning Outcomes

Student learning outcomes are a way to communicate among faculty, to students, administrators and others what students will be able to do by the end of the program of study. Student learning outcomes support the program and individual faculty in designing the curriculum and individual classes.

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Create student learning outcomes for their program of study
  • Ensure student learning outcomes are student centered and assessable
  • Create consensus among the faculty about what the student learning outcomes should be.

This workshop is designed to be taken by program faculty as a group (as part of a faculty retreat, for example).

Curriculum Mapping

Curriculum mapping is a method to align courses/requirements with student learning outcomes. Among its many uses and benefits, a curriculum map — or matrix — can help reveal the contributions of individual courses to the curriculum, identify any gaps, and help programs plan assessment.

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Create a curriculum map
  • Interpret a curriculum map
  • Understand how curriculum maps can support assessment

This workshop is designed to be taken by program faculty as a group (as part of a faculty retreat, for example).

Assignment Design Charrette

An assignment design charrette workshop offers instructors an opportunity to share an assignment with peers. In 30-minute carousel format, instructors give feedback on their own and others’ assignments with particular attention paid to the ways in which assignments are linked to and reinforce student learning outcomes, communicate expectations to students, and assess performance. Potential questions include: How does this assignment help students develop the knowledge and skills required in this course and in the program? What prior knowledge might be necessary for student success with this assignment?  How does this assignment communicate to students its purpose, tasks, and expectations for success?  How does it engage students, scaffold skills, and animate learning? How might an assignment be modified for clarity?

At the end of the charrette workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Provide meaningful feedback to help create or modify assignments in order to improve student learning

This workshop is designed to be taken by program faculty as a group (as part of a faculty retreat, for example), faculty from a group of programs, or faculty with a common focus (e.g., capstone project, methods assignment, group presentation, writing in the major assignment, etc.).

Assignment Design Mini-Workshop

An assignment design mini-workshop is an abbreviated form of an assignment charrette and has a somewhat different purpose. Workshops are often organized by discipline or affinity groups. In this format, instructors bring in an existing assignment geared to a particular student learning outcome (SLO) selected in advance. Participants also bring in samples of past student work, usually an exemplary example and less-than-stellar example for sharing with others. In the session, participants brainstorm about ways to fine-tune existing assignments in order to better measure student performance, per the pre-selected SLO and reflecting basic elements of assignment design for transparency (clarifying the purpose, tasks, and expectations to students). Such a workshop might be of particular interest to programs as they plan their direct assessment activities in future semesters.

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  •  Fine-tune existing assignments in order to better measure student performance

This workshop is designed to be taken by program faculty as a group (as part of a faculty retreat, for example), faculty from a group of programs, or faculty with a common focus (e.g., capstone project, methods assignment, group presentation, writing in the major assignment, etc.).

Rubric Development

Rubrics are one tool useful in assessing student learning outcomes. After creating student learning outcomes, a rubric can be developed to assess student writing, performance or other work. Ensuring faculty agree what is a high, medium, or low student performance is essential in providing the program with feedback about its effectiveness.

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Create a rubric for the program’s student learning outcomes
  • Ensure the rubric is effective to rate student work

This workshop is designed to be taken by program faculty as a group (as part of a faculty retreat, for example).

Effective Rubric Use for Program Assessment

Rubric use is effective when faculty align with what high, medium and low ratings are. This workshop brings faculty together to explore their interpretations of the student learning outcomes and how students perform to standards. The workshop is designed to create a consensus among faculty about rating using the rubric.

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Use the rubric to rate student work consistently among the faculty

This workshop is designed to be taken by program faculty as a group (as part of a faculty retreat, for example).

Use of Assessment

In this interactive workshop, we will share ways to present and interpret results from program assessment activities, so that results can contribute to decisions that support student learning and assessment. Samples will be included.

At the end of the workshop, participants will be able to:

  • Understand specific ways to use assessment results
  • Apply strategies for aligning results from different measures
  • Interpret assessment results
  • Use techniques to help their department and faculty discuss assessment results and act on them

Annual Assessment Report Writing Workshop

This workshop is designed to support assessment coordinators writing annual undergraduate assessment reports for their programs. We will provide you with a copy of last year’s annual report for your program and the new report form with changes highlighted. In addition, we will go over each section and each participant will leave with a to-do list and timeline to complete the report by the June 1st report deadline.

Other Workshops

  • Creating Embedded Assessment
  • Developing Senior Exit Surveys
  • Standard Setting: Creating Program-level Benchmarks

 

  • Developing an Assessment Plan
  • Supporting Faculty Involvement in Assessment
  • Other workshops tailored for your program
Washington State University